Three Simple Steps to Net-Zero

New and existing homes can be designed to be "net-zero energy", meaning they produce as much energy as they consume over the span of a year. First, energy demands are reduced by using proper insulation, an airtight seal, and high-performing windows and doors. Secondly, energy efficient mechanical equipment and appliances are installed. Finally, clean energy is generated on site by taking advantage of renewable resources such as solar or wind. 

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1. INSULATION and AIRTIGHTNESS 

Reducing the amount of heat transferred between the inside of your home and the outside environment results in a substantial decrease to your home’s energy requirements. Elements that lower heat transfer include exterior insulation, an airtight seal, and triple-glazed windows. Together, these elements result in more than just energy savings. Additional benefits include a highly stable and uniform temperature throughout the house, even in the most extreme summer or winter weather conditions.

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2. Energy Efficient Equipment 

Imagine putting in one dollar into your bank account and getting four in return. That’s kind of how a heat pump works – giving more energy output (heating or cooling) than it takes in. So, forget that furnace! With state-of-the-art mechanical equipment and energy-efficient lighting and appliances, your entire home can be powered by clean electricity. As a bonus, the indoor air is filtered to be free of dust and allergens.

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3. Generating Renewable Energy

By including a way to generate renewable energy on site, such as solar panels or a wind turbine, your home can produce all the energy it requires throughout the year. By remaining connected to the electricity grid, you get the best of both worlds. You maintain reliable electricity service at times when your demand exceeds your production without the need for on-site storage, while earning credits when there is excess energy produced. These credits reduce the monthly energy bill to a small transmission and administration fee. 

Check out how a conventional home's exterior got a facelift to be net-zero ready!